Colorado Labor and Employment Law 2019 Outlook

Predicting twelve months of legal changes, even in labor law or employment law, is a tough game in 2019. We have an unpredictable White House, a recent change to the U.S. Supreme Court and turnover in the U.S. House and Colorado Senate in favor of Democrats. It may simply be too early to tell how 2019 will treat Colorado, if only because we do not even know what bills legislators will submit to the federal and state legislatures. That said, we can look at the changes for 2019 in existing federal and Colorado law and at least set up some basic predictions about how labor and employment law may change for Coloradans this year.

Changes to federal labor law and employment law in 2019

Federal employment law changes are already on the books for the administrative agencies. Executive Order 13658 increases minimum wage for federal contractors to $10.60/hour (or $7.40/hour for tipped employees who suffer the tip credit). Beginning January 14, 2019, 45 C.F.R. § 147.132 and 45 C.F.R. § 147.133 allow certain private employers to opt out of federally required contraceptive coverage if the employer has a sincere moral or religious objection to covering contraceptives on the employer’s health insurance plan.

Additionally, the EEOC published new rules on wellness program incentives that take effect on the first day of 2019. Previously employers were permitted under EEOC guidance to grant employees up to a 30% discount on health insurance premiums if the employee participated in an employer-sponsored wellness program without violating the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA). In late 2018 a federal district court ruled the incentive rules could render a wellness program involuntary and run afoul the ADA and GINA.

Changes under Colorado labor law and employment law for 2019

Colorado state law will also see a significant change. Beginning January 1, 2019, a minimum wage increase goes into effect. In 2016 Amendment 70 to the Colorado Constitution was passed by voters establishing a new minimum wage regime for the state. Each year through 2020 minimum wage increases by a fixed amount. Subsequent years will increase with inflation. The 2019 Colorado minimum wage is $11.10/hourly. (Read here to learn more about the Colorado minimum wage for 2019 and years forward.) Colorado joins twenty-one other states increasing minimum wage above the federal minimum wage in 2019. 

What 2019 will likely bring for federal labor law and employment law

Predicting 2019 for labor law and employment law is not necessarily an easy task given the changes in the legislature, Supreme Court and the White House. The interplay between Democratic control of the House and Republican control of the rest of the federal government is already on play with the shutdown. Who knows how that will continue to unfold until the Dems put in motion their legislative agenda for the year. The current administration would surprise few to continue to unwind Obama administration DOL regulations. 

Federal shutdown’s effect on labor and employment law

The current federal shutdown is certain to have some effect on federal labor and employment law issues. Although courts remain open through a shutdown, many labor and employment law agencies close, including the EEOC. That can create problems filing administrative complaints for employment discrimination claims, among other administrative remedies. Federal employees in particular who believe they have labor or employment law-related complaints should contact an employment law attorney right away. Do not assume the shutdown of an agency means filing deadlines for complaints are suspended. That is often not the case.

Anti-union activist support

Across the country we should expect to see continued challenges to the validity and activity of public unions. In 2018’s awful Janus decision the Supreme Court trashed public union agency fees and set the tone for anti-union activists that they would find an ally in the current SCOTUS majority. 

Sexual harassment lawsuits

2017 and 2018 saw a rise in sexual harassment lawsuits as part of the #metoo movement and Weinstein effect. These lawsuits are likely to continue through 2019 although new high profile cases may wane with the Supreme Court’s 2018 activity. It’s hard to imagine Brett Kavanaugh’s contentious confirmation hearings was not a serious wound to the spreading belief that the #metoo movement was stamping out the acceptability of sexual harassment.

Perhaps more importantly, SCOTUS decided a trio of cases last year affirming the use of class action waivers in employment arbitration agreements. These class action waivers permit employers to push class actions out of litigation into private arbitration forums where they will avoid publicity of the details of the case, not to mention the final outcome. Employers fearing class action sexual harassment lawsuits likely will add these waivers to their arbitration agreements or review existing waiver to ensure complicity with the Supreme Court opinions. 

Predictions for Colorado labor and employment law in 2019

Colorado labor law and employment law will likely see changes in 2019 as well, particularly with Democrats obtaining control of both houses of the state legislature and the executive. Every legislative session House Democrats propose pro-employee and pro-labor bills that were generally blocked by the Republican-controlled Colorado Senate. Now that Democrats control both houses they should be able to pass many of these bills. We do not yet know what the legislative agenda will include for the Colorado legislature but we can predict two likely areas of labor and employment law that will appear in 2019.

Colorado minimum wage changes

In addition to the constitutional minimum wage change for 2019 across the state, this may be the year Democrats pass legislation to allow cities to set their own minimum wage. Senate Republicans blocked this frequent proposal but now Dems may get their wish to push through more flexibility across the state. Liberal cities like Denver and Boulder are likely to raise minimum wage to $15/hour if given the opportunity. 

Marijuana laws and employment

Denver marijuana employment laws

Colorado has been an important place for the intersection of marijuana legalization and employment, particularly since the 2015 decision in Coats v. Dish Network. Colorado Democrats may push legislation this year to resolve the unfortunate result in Coats by statutorily prohibiting employers from adversely using a marijuana-positive drug test in employment decisions. 

There also appears strong momentum behind proposals to erase pre-legalization marijuana possession convictions. Boulder and Denver indicated intent to make these changes through judicial means. There is also a lot of talk among Colorado legislators to enact state-wide legislation erasing these convictions. That could substantially help workers in the job market held back by marijuana possession convictions. 

 

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